South Carol Liner in South Carolina

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C2+V2 1: South Carolina

After relaxing on the beach for awhile in the Florida Keys I flew up to Charleston in South Carolina after changing into a seagull for the journey.

After taking in the history of Charleston I crossed the bay over to Mount Pleasant, which was also pleasant.

I was going to take a boat up the coast from there, but when I went to the port there was only one ship there, and no other voyages were planned for the foreseeable future. So I thought I’d get on that boat, and went to board.

However, as I approached the ship a guard asked me what my name was. I didn’t know why I was being asked, so I just replied ‘Greenygrey’. The guard looked at me with astonishment, before replying: ‘Greenygrey, you tried to get on the Carol liner with a name like Greenygrey; where are you from, everybody in South Carolina knows the Carol liner is only for people called Carol’.

I was taken aback; brangled and in shock. If I’d unbrangled myself quickly enough I might have retorted that my middle name was Carol, but at the time I just sloped off, with my tail between my legs so to speak.

Anyway, it all worked out well in the end, because I got to see loads of sunny South Carolina.

First, I travelled across the Sandhills, and enjoyed running up the banks and then rolling down the other sides.

I met some cool geese at Goose Creek, ate orange burgers in Orangeburg, danced the salsa in Columbia, fitted into Greenville, and joined a mock battle in Spartanburg.

After running around the mountains in the Piedmont, I made my way back to the east coast by nightfall, and slept on Myrtle Beach.

The Carol liner docked two hours later.

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About Marc Latham

The Folding Mirror poetry form emerged from the haiku structure in 2007, and the first published poem by Marc Latham was in January 2008. Caroline Gill clarified the form in 2010, while Wendy Webb and the Norfolk Poets have been very supportive in publishing and publicising the form. Claire Knight and Sarah James have also been instrumental in the form's evolution.

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