Wall and Gong in Wollongong Keeps us Moving On

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Collection of The University of Wollongong, Wo...

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We continued north up the east coast, thinking we’d overnight in Wollongong.  We stopped in Shell Cove to re-energise, and were served by a friendly snail called Michelle.

Her shell reminded me of lobsters, and I told her I hadn’t seen any around. Michelle replied with the Ode of Shell Cove:

There were 110 lobsters eating pears
contentedly up a crab-apple tree.
When along came a storm
and swept them out to sea.
They made themselves at home
and decided that’s where they’d be.

Warilla and Warrawong Before Wollongong

As we passed Warilla we saw gorillas warring on the beach. I was amazed to see this, as the gentle giants are usually very peaceful.

This was confirmed when we reached Warrawong, because the beach was full of gorillas holding a peace protest proclaiming war is wrong.

Wall and Gong Prevent Landing in Wollongong

We were still a little shaken by what we witnessed in Warilla as we approached Wollongong, and then we heard a deafening gong sound reach us from the north.

I wondered if we should land at Wollongong, as planned. The decision was made for us when we approached the city, because there was a massive wall all around it, just above the gong.

So we continued past it, hearing the gonging grow ever louder until reaching its zenith off Battery Park.

Somewhere between Wombarra and Scarborough we reached silence again.

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